tiny buddha

by rantywoman

Of course I’ve had moments of wondering if I made the wrong decision by moving back here, but I’ve realized that there are few truly wrong decisions. Things have a way of working out when we make the best decision we can given the knowledge we have at the time.

I liked these posts:

http://tinybuddha.com/blog/when-you-fear-making-the-wrong-decision/

Make peace with your emotions.

Emotions, even ones we assign negative value to, (like fear) provide us with valuable information and serve very specific functions. If you can get over the hostile relationship with emotions, they can be highly useful.

Emotions can:

let you know what’s important to you
prompt you to take some action
guide you toward an aspect of yourself that needs to be exposed and healed
let you know when you’re our of balance so that you can bring it back to center.

Understand that there are no “wrong” decisions.

It really takes the pressure off if you understand that every experience you have, whether you characterize it as “good” or “bad,” is exactly the experience you need to have at that moment. Some choices may lead to more painful lessons than others, but living life in fear of living life is no way to live.

http://tinybuddha.com/featured/10-questions-to-ask-yourself-before-giving-up-on-your-dream/

1. Why did you want to pursue this goal to begin with—and has anything changed?

You had a good reason for committing to this plan. Maybe you visualized a financially free future once you started this new business, or you realized you’d live longer and healthier if you lost 40 pounds.

Odds are you still want those things as much as you did before; you just stopped believing you could have them because your attempts have yet to yield results. Now you have to ask yourself: If you push through the discomfort, will it be worth it in the end?

http://tinybuddha.com/blog/4-powerful-questions-to-free-you-from-the-daze-of-fear-and-inaction/

Bottom Line

In the end it all comes down to one thing: change isn’t easy.

Despite your best-laid plans, you will have a few very low points. Your chances of success are often a result of how well you respond to them.

This—the fear, the anxiety and the panic of starting—is just one of the low points.

If you can beat this fear, you will not just succeed at making a new start now, but you’ll significantly improve your chances of surviving through all the future lows.

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